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Meeting Report (June 1, 2013)

March 23, 2014

Sis. Patricia Wittberg, S.C., Professory of Socilogy and Religion at IUPUI, joined us to discuss social change within religious orders and the role of conscience in objection. Professor Wittberg is the author of numerous books an articles on the sociology of religion and on religious communities, including:

  • Building Strong Church Communities: A Sociological Overview. Paperback: 272 pages. Publisher: Paulist Press (September 1, 2012) Language: English ISBN-10: 0809147742, ISBN-13: 978-0809147748
  • The Rise and Decline of Catholic Religious Orders: A Social Movement Perspective Series: SUNY Series in Religion, Culture, and Society. Paperback: 436 pages. Publisher: State University of New York Press (October 25, 1994) Language: English ISBN-10: 0791422305, ISBN-13: 978-0791422304.

Dr. Douglas Herrmann, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Indiana State University, also joined us. Professor Herrmann co-edited the Journal of Applied Cognitive Psychology from 1987 until 1991. He was the editor of the journal Cognitive Technology from 1996 to 2005. He has written or edited seventeen textbooks concerned with various aspects of human memory, including the history of memory scholarship, memory functioning in everyday life, memory improvement, and cognitive rehabilitation. We are very pleased to have Dr. Herrmann join us and look forward to benefiting from his expertise in cognitive psychology.

Announcement:

We were very pleased to announce that Ms. Maureen (“Mo”) Wilson had agreed to be the second Stilwell Summer Intern of the Conscience Project. Mo is a recent graduate from McCormick Theological Seminary and is engaged in the Presbyterian ordination process. In addition to the internship, Mo expected to have duties at Irvington Presbyterian Church as Director of Children and Family Ministries. Among her experiences with youth, Mo worked in Northern Ireland with youth from both Catholic and Protestant families.

Recent Activities:

The Illuminated Lyric of Lafracoth. Exhibit. IU School of Medicine Art Show, March 13-14, 2013.
Conscience sensitive moral education: Is it possible? University of Indianapolis, April 10, 2013.

Photographs courtesy of Joe DiMicco

Conscience sensitive moral education: Is it possible? University of Indianapolis, April 10, 2013.

Conscience sensitive moral education: Is it possible? University of Indianapolis, April 10, 2013.

Susan DiMicco discussed her career experiences as a guidance counselor with an abiding interest in values education. She identified challenges and limitations in moral educational efforts. She presented the method of using the VALUE MATRIX as one of the conscience sensitive tasks.

Susan DiMicco discussed her career experiences as a guidance counselor with an abiding interest in values education. She identified challenges and limitations in moral educational efforts. She presented the method of using the VALUE MATRIX as one of the conscience sensitive tasks.

Jere Odell offered a parent’s perspective and presented the conscience sensitive task in MORAL IMAGINATION.

Jere Odell offered a parent’s perspective and presented the conscience sensitive task in MORAL IMAGINATION.

Julia Bradshaw discussed her experiences from years of CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE GROUP WORK with children and adolescents in therapeutic residential care. Matt Galvin discussed CONSCIENCE THEORY and CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE PSYCHIATRY and provided a conceptual framework for how CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE APPROACHES TO MORAL EDUCATION might be included in general and special education contexts.

Julia Bradshaw discussed her experiences from years of CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE GROUP WORK with children and adolescents in therapeutic residential care. Matt Galvin discussed CONSCIENCE THEORY and CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE PSYCHIATRY and provided a conceptual framework for how CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE APPROACHES TO MORAL EDUCATION might be included in general and special education contexts.

Meg Gaffney discussed her CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE APPROACH TO ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM with health care professional students and led the discussion about her favorite domains: MORALIZED ATTACHMENT and MORAL EMOTIONAL RESPONSIVENESS.

Meg Gaffney discussed her CONSCIENCE SENSITIVE APPROACH TO ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM with health care professional students and led the discussion about her favorite domains: MORALIZED ATTACHMENT and MORAL EMOTIONAL RESPONSIVENESS.

Works in Progress:

Galvin, M. A Conscience Sensitive Approach to Moral Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology. Presentation for Psychiatry residents.

What We’re Reading:

King, B. J. (2013). Frans de Waal’s Bottom-Up Morality: We’re Not Good Because Of God. NPR.org. Retrieved March 23, 2014, from http://www.npr.org/blogs/13.7/2013/03/21/174830095/frans-de-waals-bottom-up-morality-were-not-good-because-of-god (M.M.G.)
Pescosolido, B. A., Medina, T. R., Martin, J. K., & Long, J. S. (2013). The “backbone” of stigma: identifying the global core of public prejudice associated with mental illness. American Journal of Public Health, 103(5), 853–860. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.301147 (M.G.)
Sulmasy, D. P. (2012, April 2). Machines in Motion. America Magazine. Retrieved from http://americamagazine.org/issue/culture/machines-motion (M.M.G.)
Klosterman, C. (2013, May 10). Should I Protect a Patient at the Expense of an Innocent Stranger? The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/12/magazine/should-i-protect-a-patient-at-the-expense-of-an-innocent-stranger.html (M.M.G.)
Roby, D. (2013). Overview of Conscientious Objection with Special Attention to Quaker Conscientious Objectors in World War II: Unlikely Heroes of Psychiatric Reform. American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting. San Francisco, CA. (J.O.)

Next Meeting: September 14, 2013

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